Healthcare News

No One-Size-Fits-All for Hydrating During Sports

Waiting until you're thirsty to drink during sports could lead to dehydration and poorer performance, a new study finds.

Source: Health Day

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Mortality down with spinal anesthesia for hip Fx surgery

For patients undergoing hip fracture fixation, general anesthesia (GA) is associated with increased 90-day mortality compared with spinal anesthesia (SA), according to a study presented at the 2018 World Congress on Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, held from April 19 to 21 in New York City.

Source: Medical Xpress

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Depressive symptoms associated with disease severity in patients with knee osteoarthritis

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that among individuals with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA), decreased physical performance and greater structural disease severity are associated with a higher risk of experiencing depressive symptoms.

Source: Medical Xpress

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Deltoid pain: Types and treatment

The deltoid is a large muscle responsible for lifting the arm and giving the shoulder its range of motion.

Source: Medical News Today

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When Can I Return to Play After an Orthopedic Sports Injury?

Recovery is as unique to the individual as is their genetic makeup – it really does depend on a wide variety of factors. However, for many common orthopedic injuries, there's usually a fairly consistent timeline for return to sport or active living.

Source: US News

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Why Do I Have Uneven Shoulders?

Uneven shoulders occur when one shoulder is higher than the other. This can be a slight or significant difference and may be due to several causes. Luckily, there are steps you can take to bring your body back into balance and alignment.

Source: Healthline

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What are the symptoms of rotator cuff tendinitis?

Rotator cuff tendinitis is inflammation of the connective tissues that help the shoulder to move. The condition is also called an impinged shoulder or impingement syndrome.

Source: Medical News Today

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Health Tip: Signs You Need Rotator Cuff Surgery

The rotator cuff is a collection of tendons and muscles that surround the shoulder. It's common for athletes -- for example, baseball pitchers -- to injure this area.

Source: HealthDay

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Return to play for soccer athletes and risk for future injury

A new study presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) looked at soccer athletes who sustained an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to better understand the average return to play time and their risk of injury following a revision ACL reconstruction.

Source: Medical Xpress

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Delayed rotator cuff repair yielded superior functional outcomes vs immediate repair

Despite improvements in clinical outcomes and a low incidence of retears among patients who underwent either immediate or delayed surgical repair of a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear, results published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine showed delayed surgery yielded superior functional outcomes at 6 months postoperatively.

Source: Healio

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Study shows men and women tear ACL the same way in non-contact injury

While women are two to four times more likely than men to tear the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee, the cause of this injury is no different between the sexes, according to new research.

Source: Science Daily

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Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildren

The type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference. This is shown by a major Danish study from researchers at the University of Southern Denmark and University of Copenhagen. Eight to ten-year-old schoolchildren develop stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance when ball games or circuit training are on the timetable.

Source: Science Daily

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Return to Work After Anatomic Total Shoulder Arthroplasty for Patients 55 Years and Younger at Average 5-Year Follow-up

As the number of anatomic total shoulder arthroplasties performed on younger patients continues to grow, return to work after surgery becomes increasingly important. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty to return patients 55 years or younger to work postoperatively. A retrospective review was performed of consecutive anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty patients.

Source: Healio

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Imaging identifies cartilage regeneration in long-distance runners

Using a mobile MRI truck, researchers followed runners for 4,500 kilometers through Europe to study the physical limits and adaptation of athletes over a 64-day period, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Source: RSNA News

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Martial arts can be hazardous to kids

(HealthDay)—Perhaps there’s a black belt in your child’s future. But for safety’s sake, kids should only engage in noncontact forms of martial arts, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says.

Source: Medical Xpress

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The Relationship Between Shoulder Stiffness and Rotator Cuff Healing

A total of 1,533 consecutive shoulders had an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon. Patients assessed their shoulder stiffness using a Likert scale preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 weeks (6 months) postoperatively, and examiners evaluated passive range of motion preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Repair integrity was determined by ultrasound evaluation at 6 months.

Source: The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

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Single image slice may not capture 3-D muscle measurements in rotator cuff tears

Patients with rotator cuff tears experience fatty infiltration increased percentages of most likely caused primarily by muscle atrophy and a single image slice did not capture 3-D muscle measurements, according to recently published data.

Source: Healio

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Does platelet-rich plasma for the knee work?

Athletes such as Tiger Woods and Rafael Nadal are rumored to have undergone a relatively new treatment that involves injections of platelet-rich plasma. Proponents say the therapy offers cutting-edge treatment for previously debilitating injuries, including painful knee problems due to osteoarthritis.

Source: Medical News Today

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Better fix for torn ACLs

A torn anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the most common knee injuries. Approximately 200,000 Americans experience a torn ACL each year, and more than half undergo surgical repairs. Now, researchers have developed a model to show that a newer surgical technique results in a stronger, more natural ACL repair.

Source: Science Daily

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Preoperative opioid use linked with lower outcome scores after TSA

Patients with a history of preoperative opioid use experienced significantly lower preoperative baseline and final outcome scores after total shoulder arthroplasty than patients who did not take opioids preoperatively, according to results.

Source: Healio

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Comparable results seen with high- vs low-intensity plyometric exercise after ACL reconstruction

Results from this randomized controlled trial showed both low- and high-intensity plyometric exercise for rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction positively affected knee function, knee impairments and psychological status among patients after 8 weeks of intervention.

Source: Healio

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Quadriceps exercise relieves pain in knee osteoarthritis

A quadriceps isometric contraction exercise method is effective for relieving pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA), according to a study published online May 25 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

Source: Medical Xpress

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Study looks at needles in treatment for shoulder pain

According to a new study, the type of procedure used to treat shoulder calcifications should be tailored to the type of calcification. The results of the study will help interventional radiologists determine whether to use one or two needles for an ultrasound-guided treatment for a common condition called rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

Source: Science Daily

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Biomechanical acoustics study sheds light on running injuries

Devoted runners suffer from a surprisingly high rate of injury. One reason for these injuries is that runners endure many shocks from the impact, and these cause vibrations that travel from the foot throughout the entire body. A researcher who focuses on acoustics and biomechanics, studied these repetitive shocks and investigated how runners adapt their running patterns.

Source: Science Daily

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Platelet-rich plasma injections may lead to improvements in tissue healing

After platelet-rich plasma injections, researchers have described the structural change in the healing process as well as improvement in patients’ pain and function, in a new report.

Source: Science Daily

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Arthroscopic Treatment of Hip Pain in Adolescent Patients With Borderline Dysplasia of the Hip: Minimum 2-Year Follow-Up

This study shows favorable 2-year outcomes in adolescent patients with borderline dysplasia undergoing labral treatment and capsular plication. Outcomes in the borderline dysplastic patients were as good as those of a control group. Although adolescents with borderline dysplasia have traditionally been a challenging group of patients to treat, these results suggest that an arthroscopic approach that addresses both labral pathology and instability may be beneficial.

Source: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery

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Preventing long-term complications of an ACL tear

A torn ACL (also known as the anterior cruciate ligament) is one of the most common knee injuries, with as many as 200,000 cases per year in the U.S. Young people under the age of 20 are at particular risk, in part because of participation in sports.

Source: Medical Xpress

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Tenodesis, tenotomy showed favorable results in treatment of long head of biceps tendon lesions

Results presented at the Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Meeting showed favorable results with both tenodesis and tenotomy in the treatment of lesions of the long head of the biceps tendon.

Source: Healio

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Patient Understanding, Expectations, and Satisfaction Regarding Rotator Cuff Injuries and Surgical Management

Rotator cuff injuries are among the most common in orthopaedics, with rotator cuff repair surgery consistently reported as one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasingly important outcome metric as health care continues to evolve with regard to quality measures affecting physician reimbursement.

Source: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery

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Intense training without proper recovery may compromise bone health in elite rowers

Bone mineral density, an indicator of bone strength, typically increases with regular exercise, acting as a protective mechanism against bone fractures and osteoporosis. But a new study suggests that the extended, high-intensity training sessions of elite athletes could reverse beneficial bone changes.

Source: Science Daily

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Hip dysplasia: When is surgery required?

What causes hip dysplasia in adults, and can it be treated without a total hip replacement?

Source: Medical Xpress

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Care of Shoulder Pain in the Overhead Athlete

Shoulder complaints are common in the overhead athlete. Understanding the biomechanics of throwing and swimming requires understanding the importance of maintaining the glenohumeral relationship of the shoulder.

Source: Healio

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Improvements in ACL surgery may help prevent knee osteoarthritis

Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee frequently leads to early-onset osteoarthritis, a painful condition that can occur even if the patient has undergone ACL reconstruction to prevent its onset. A new review looks at the ability of two different reconstruction techniques to restore normal knee motion and potentially slow degenerative changes

Source: Medical Xpress

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Age not a factor in success of shoulder replacement surgery

Whether you’re younger than 65 or older than 75, age may not be a discernible factor in the success of shoulder replacement surgery, according to a new study.

Source: Science Daily

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